Politics is not a bad profession. If you succeed there are many rewards, if you disgrace yourself you can always write a book.

–Ronald Reagan

Chapter 10. Elected to the Republican slate of delegates for Richard Nixon from the Great State of Tennessee…

Elected to the Repub­li­can slate of del­e­gates for Richard Nixon from the Great State of Ten­nessee, I was in no way a king­maker. After all, Richard Nixon raked in 5,378,704 votes in the pri­mary or 86.92% of the votes cast, and 47,168,710 votes or 60.7% of those votes cast in the Novem­ber gen­eral, a pul­sat­ing land­slide vic­tory, mea­sur­ably meek how­ever beside the Elec­toral Col­lege wipe­out. The nation had spo­ken. The hip­pies had lost. Only Mass­a­chu­setts and the Dis­trict of Colum­bia sang blue. Vot­ing Dis­trict by vot­ing dis­trict went red. The sta­tis­ti­cal maps of this elec­tion are truly work the search. Nixon. in a moon­walk, snagged 520 votes. George McGov­ern, pulled in a pal­try 17, had lost his own home state. A sin­gle vote for the Lib­er­tar­ian can­di­date from Cal­i­for­nia, a man now squarely for­got­ten and irrel­e­vant in most cir­cles today is worth not­ing how­ever. In cher­ished EC, and should we add—Libertarian—tradition, whence elec­tors retain their auton­omy and free will of a sorts, a faith­less elec­tor, Roger MacBride, orig­i­nally pledged to vote for Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew, instead punched the Lib­er­tar­ian ticket in protest of some­thing now lost to obscu­rity, if not his­tory itself. In United States pres­i­den­tial elec­tions, a faith­less elec­tor is a mem­ber of the Elec­toral Col­lege who does not vote for the can­di­date they have pledged to vote for. Faith­less elec­tors are pledged elec­tors and thus dif­fer­ent from unpledged elec­tors. Now, name the ticket the enter­pris­ing Vir­ginia elec­tor Roger MacBride sup­ported in the 1972 EC. Trivia buffs, quickly, for $1000, the answer is…

On 158 occa­sions, elec­tors have cast their votes for Pres­i­dent or Vice Pres­i­dent in a man­ner dif­fer­ent from that pre­scribed by the leg­is­la­ture of the state they rep­re­sented. Of those, 71 votes were changed because the orig­i­nal can­di­date died before the elec­tor was able to cast a vote. Two votes were not cast at all when elec­tors chose to abstain from cast­ing their elec­toral vote for any can­di­date. The remain­ing 85 were changed by the elector’s per­sonal inter­est, or per­haps by acci­dent. Usu­ally, the faith­less elec­tors act alone. An excep­tion was the U.S. pres­i­den­tial elec­tion of 1836, in which 23 Vir­ginia elec­tors con­spired to change their vote together. What is it with the Virginians?

The media were much more thor­ough back in the Nixon years than they are now in the Obama era. The Con­ven­tion made the news that night. Gov­er­nor Ronald Rea­gan (R-CA) and Con­gress­woman Shirley Chisholm (D-NY) were the only can­di­dates who per­son­ally greeted the del­e­gates. The remain­ing can­di­dates of both major polit­i­cal par­ties sent stand-in rep­re­sen­ta­tion or sur­ro­gates, as they call them now, to speak in glow­ing terms for their candidates.

At sev­en­teen, dirty hand pol­i­tics had wafted in on Sandburg’s lit­tle cat’s feet, assum­ing the form of school work which had always been and would remain my refuge from the war at home. School was a orga­niz­ing box of pretty but dis­or­ga­nized relics I couldn’t take seri­ously until I arranged and re-arranged them to suit my will, to suit the sen­si­bil­ity that gave every­one a fair shot at becom­ing them­selves with steal­ing that chance from other, but in its most basic form, it had always been an escape into the ten­der worlds of great­ness more fit­ting the fluid self, the per­fect tra­verse, the angle that had never been mea­sured, the cal­cu­la­tion that only a name could sup­ply, the hour of the wit­ness who would always stop short of sanc­ti­fy­ing a lie where mag­ni­fy­ing men die. sigh­ing women cry, and the chil­dren sim­ply stop being born. I never imag­ined myself hav­ing to fight oth­ers to win a place of belong­ing, a place of grace, a place where smart suc­cess­ful peo­ple were smart and suc­cess­ful enough to share what they had with not just the friends of strength and fame but its ene­mies just as gen­er­ously. After Daly Chicago, the tele­vised riots of 1968, Viet­nam all these years, I hardly knew what to think about Amer­ica, so other than mem­o­riz­ing facts and enter­tain­ing class­mates with long rolling imper­ti­nent debates

Free­dom is never more than one gen­er­a­tion away from extinc­tion. We didn’t pass it to our chil­dren in the blood­stream. It must be fought for, pro­tected, and handed on for them to do the same”

Gov­ern­ment does not solve prob­lems; it sub­si­dizes them.
Ronald Reagan

How do you tell a com­mu­nist? Well, it’s some­one who reads Marx and Lenin. And how do you tell an anti-Communist? It’s some­one who under­stands Marx and Lenin.
Ronald Reagan

I favor the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and it must be enforced at gun­point if nec­es­sary.
Ronald Reagan

I’ve never been able to under­stand why a Repub­li­can con­trib­u­tor is a ‘fat cat’ and a Demo­c­ra­tic con­trib­u­tor of the same amount of money is a ‘public-spirited phil­an­thropist’.
Ronald Reagan

I have won­dered at times what the Ten Com­mand­ments would have looked like if Moses had run them through the US Con­gress.
Ronald Reagan

Gov­ern­ments tend not to solve prob­lems, only to rearrange them. Gov­ern­ment always finds a need for what­ever money it gets. Government’s view of the econ­omy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps mov­ing, reg­u­late it. And if it stops mov­ing, sub­si­dize it.
Ronald Reagan

Gov­ern­ment exists to pro­tect us from each other. Where gov­ern­ment has gone beyond its lim­its is in decid­ing to pro­tect us from our­selves. Government’s first duty is to pro­tect the peo­ple, not run their lives.
Ronald Reagan

Infla­tion is as vio­lent as a mug­ger, as fright­en­ing as an armed rob­ber and as deadly as a hit man.
Ronald Reagan

Mr Gor­bachev, tear down this wall!
Ronald Reagan

No gov­ern­ment ever vol­un­tar­ily reduces itself in size. Gov­ern­ment pro­grams, once launched, never dis­ap­pear. Actu­ally, a gov­ern­ment bureau is the near­est thing to eter­nal life we’ll ever see on this earth!
Ronald Reagan

Infor­ma­tion is the oxy­gen of the mod­ern age. It seeps through the walls topped by barbed wire, it wafts across the elec­tri­fied bor­ders.
Ronald Reagan

If the fed­eral gov­ern­ment had been around when the Cre­ator was putting His hand to this state, Indi­ana wouldn’t be here. It’d still be wait­ing for an envi­ron­men­tal impact state­ment.
Ronald Reagan

Pol­i­tics I sup­posed to be the second-oldest pro­fes­sion. I have come to real­ize that it bears a very close resem­blance to the first.
Ronald Reagan

Pol­i­tics is just like show busi­ness. You have a hell of an open­ing, coast for a while, and then have a hell of a close.
Ronald Reagan

Trust, but ver­ify.
Ronald Reagan

Within the cov­ers of the Bible are the answers for all the prob­lems men face.
Ronald Reagan

Don’t read the NYT. It’s bad for your teeth. Or some­thing.
GT

We can’t help every­one, but every­one can help some­one.
Ronald Reagan

If I eat enough bread and rice, maybe I will become too big to fail.
GT

A tree’s a tree. How many more do you need to look at?
Ronald Reagan

You can tell alot about a fellow’s char­ac­ter by his way of eat­ing jelly­beans.
Ronald Reagan

When you can’t make them see the light, make them feel the heat.
Ronald Reagan

We must reject the idea that every time a law’s bro­ken, soci­ety is guilty rather than the law­breaker. It is time to restore the Amer­i­can pre­cept that each indi­vid­ual is account­able for his actions.
Ronald Reagan

The most ter­ri­fy­ing words in the Eng­lish lan­guage are: I’m from the gov­ern­ment and I’m here to help.
Ronald Reagan

Today, if you invent a bet­ter mouse­trap, the gov­ern­ment comes along with a bet­ter mouse.
Ronald Reagan

There are no con­straints on the human mind, no walls around the human spirit, no bar­ri­ers to our progress except those we our­selves erect.
Ronald Reagan

The tax­payer — that’s some­one who works for the fed­eral gov­ern­ment but doesn’t have to take the civil ser­vice exam­i­na­tion.
Ronald Rea­gan
Reces­sion is when a neigh­bor loses his job. Depres­sion is when you lose yours.
Ronald Reagan

Approx­i­mately 80% of our air pol­lu­tion stems from hydro­car­bons released by veg­e­ta­tion, so let’s not go over­board in set­ting and enforc­ing tough emis­sion stan­dards from man-made sources. Ronald Reagan

Both par­ties have already looted social secu­rity over the years, to the tune of 2.6 tril­lion, replac­ing the money with non-negotiable paper – and they just don’t want to pay it back. So instead, they did what any out-of-control gov­ern­ment does.. they devised a plan to pun­ish their vic­tims. They should all be indicted and have their per­sonal prop­erty seized like you and I would suf­fer once we were caught embez­zling. Nobody asked us if it was okay to ‘borrow” that money. Straight up fraud.

At the Demo­c­ra­tic Pri­mary, with hun­dreds of del­e­gates angry at McGov­ern for one rea­son or another, the vote was chaotic, with at least three other can­di­dates hav­ing their names put into nom­i­na­tion and votes scat­tered over 70 can­di­dates (includ­ing one, Mao Zedong, who was not from the United States and was in fact a Com­mu­nist leader in China). Now that Mao has made it into the Obama administration…

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